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New Silverlight 5 features in The Cornball

The release of Silverlight 5 is allegedly the last major release of Silverlight, but it brought some great stuff that I have now incorporated in the latest release of The Cornball.

There are a lot of good descriptions and even video samples of the new features in What's new in Silverlight 5. These are the two new features that I am using in The Cornball.

Mouse Button Double Click
Previously I have used a custom implementation with a timer to capture double clicks on the cards. But since this feature finally is included in the framework I decided to use that instead. The MouseButtonEventArgs now has a ClickCount property which simply indicates the number of times the mouse button was clicked. That leaves us with a much cleaner implementation of the single and double click scenario.

private void CardMouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    switch (e.ClickCount)
    {
    case 1:
        // Handle single click
        break;
    case 2:
        // Handle double click
        break;
    }
}

Low-Latency Sound Effects
I have had plans to include sound effects before, but there haven't really been a good enough solution to do so. The MediaElement tag made it possible to play video and audio, but was never really meant to play sound effects in this matter. In Silverlight 5 a couple of classes from the XNA framework are included, SoundEffect and SoundEffectInstance.

Instead of showing any of my code I would like to recommend the video sample by Pete Brown that displays these new features in a very good way.

To see the results of what I accomplished, please visit The Cornball and try to beat the high score!

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