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Showing posts from January, 2012

New Silverlight 5 features in The Cornball

The release of Silverlight 5 is allegedly the last major release of Silverlight, but it brought some great stuff that I have now incorporated in the latest release of The Cornball.

There are a lot of good descriptions and even video samples of the new features in What's new in Silverlight 5. These are the two new features that I am using in The Cornball.

Mouse Button Double Click
Previously I have used a custom implementation with a timer to capture double clicks on the cards. But since this feature finally is included in the framework I decided to use that instead. The MouseButtonEventArgs now has a ClickCount property which simply indicates the number of times the mouse button was clicked. That leaves us with a much cleaner implementation of the single and double click scenario.

private void CardMouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e) { switch (e.ClickCount) { case 1: // Handle single click break; case 2: // Handle double…

Microsoft LEAP Sweden 2012

I have been privileged to participate in the Lead Enterprise Architect Program at Microsoft this spring.
The Lead Enterprise Architect Program (LEAP) is a program that aims to give understanding of the strategic core components of the Microsoft platform.

LEAP consists of five master class training sessions as well as three days of sessions at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Seattle. The direction of the classes are extremely appealing and I really hope that they will live up to my expectations:

Application architecture on the Microsoft PlatformCloud computing for ArchitectsIdentity & Access ManagementIntegration on premises and in the cloudBusiness Intelligence and Enterprise Search
The program starts in February and ends with the trip to Redmond in the end of May. During this time I will try to write as much as possible about this whole experience, which I hope will be amazing!


My experience with TFS Preview

I have been using the Team Foundation Services preview for a while now, and the least I can say is that I am impressed! The web interface has a nice Metro style design and gives a high quality experience overall.

By installing the KB2581206 hotfix I can also access my TFS account from Visual Studio, which is absolutely fantastic. I might even sound a bit fanatic by saying that it is like a dream come true... The server appears as a traditional Team Foundation Server in Visual Studio apart from the logon process (a Windows Live popup window). Read more and try it out yourself!

Besides playing around with the user interface I have actually tried to work a little seriously with the service as well. Partly by uploading my project the Cornball and developing against the TFS in Visual Studio. So far this experience is very positive and I have not found any issues or oddities at all, except that the environment is kind of slow. This whole thing also takes me one step further out in the world…

Google Search Appliance .NET solution

I recently worked on a project to integrate the search results from a Google Search Appliance into a .NET application. Although it seems like a pretty straight forward task, there were some small issues that I thought I might share.

Background
The communication with the Google Search Appliance is made simply with a HTTP GET request, which returns an XML formatted response. As for the Suggest service, the request looks about the same but the result returned is JSON encoded. For more information, please see the Google Search Appliance documentation, which is very extensive.

Internationalization
Since this solution was to incorporate several languages, the .NET application had to support and differentiate the languages. The GSA has very good built-in language support but there were at least one thing that was not completely obvious.

The GSA uses either HTTP headers or query string parameters to determine in which language the request is made. If neither of these are supplied the GSA may no…